An analysis of president franklin roosevelts january 6 1941 speech to congress

In the midterm election, Roosevelt and his liberal supporters lost control of Congress to the bipartisan conservative coalition. The Second New Deal in — included the Wagner Act to protect labor organizing, the Works Progress Administration WPA relief program which made the federal government by far the largest single employer in the nation[5] the Social Security Act and new programs to aid tenant farmers and migrant workers.

An analysis of president franklin roosevelts january 6 1941 speech to congress

Text version below transcribed directly from audio. Speaker, members of the 77th Congress: I address you, the members of this new Congress, at a moment unprecedented in the history of the union.

Since the permanent formation of our government under the Constitution inmost of the periods of crisis in our history have related to our domestic affairs.

And, fortunately, only one of these -- the four-year war between the States -- ever threatened our national unity.

Today, thank God, , Americans in 48 States have forgotten points of the compass in our national unity. It is true that prior to the United States often has been disturbed by events in other continents.

We have even engaged in two wars with European nations and in a number of undeclared wars in the West Indies, in the Mediterranean and in the Pacific, for the maintenance of American rights and for the principles of peaceful commerce.

But in no case had a serious threat been raised against our national safety or our continued independence. What I seek to convey is the historic truth that the United States as a nation has at all times maintained opposition -- clear, definite opposition -- to any attempt to lock us in behind an ancient Chinese wall while the procession of civilization went past.

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Today, thinking of our children and of their children, we oppose enforced isolation for ourselves or for any other part of the Americas. That determination of ours, extending over all these years, was proved, for example, in the early days during the quarter century of wars following the French Revolution.

While the Napoleonic struggles did threaten interests of the United States because of the French foothold in the West Indies and in Louisiana, and while we engaged in the War of to vindicate our right to peaceful trade, it is nevertheless clear that neither France nor Great Britain nor any other nation was aiming at domination of the whole world.

And in like fashion, from to -- ninety-nine years -- no single war in Europe or in Asia constituted a real threat against our future or against the future of any other American nation. Except in the Maximilian interlude in Mexico, no foreign power sought to establish itself in this hemisphere.

And the strength of the British fleet in the Atlantic has been a friendly strength; it is still a friendly strength. Even when the World War broke out init seemed to contain only small threat of danger to our own American future.

An analysis of president franklin roosevelts january 6 1941 speech to congress

But as time went on, as we remember, the American people began to visualize what the downfall of democratic nations might mean to our own democracy. We need not overemphasize imperfections in the peace of Versailles.

We need not harp on failure of the democracies to deal with problems of world reconstruction. We should remember that the peace of was far less unjust than the kind of pacification which began even before Munich, and which is being carried on under the new order of tyranny that seeks to spread over every continent today.

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The American people have unalterably set their faces against that tyranny. I suppose that every realist knows that the democratic way of life is at this moment being directly assailed in every part of the world -- assailed either by arms or by secret spreading of poisonous propaganda by those who seek to destroy unity and promote discord in nations that are still at peace.

During 16 long months this assault has blotted out the whole pattern of democratic life in an appalling number of independent nations, great and small.

And the assailants are still on the march, threatening other nations, great and small. Therefore, as your President, performing my constitutional duty to "give to the Congress information of the state of the union," I find it unhappily necessary to report that the future and the safety of our country and of our democracy are overwhelmingly involved in events far beyond our borders.

Armed defense of democratic existence is now being gallantly waged in four continents.

January 6, 2018 marks the 77th anniversary of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" speech.

If that defense fails, all the population and all the resources of Europe and Asia, and Africa and Austral-Asia will be dominated by conquerors. And let us remember that the total of those populations in those four continents, the total of those populations and their resources greatly exceed the sum total of the population and the resources of the whole of the Western Hemisphere -- yes, many times over.

In times like these it is immature -- and, incidentally, untrue -- for anybody to brag that an unprepared America, single-handed and with one hand tied behind its back, can hold off the whole world.

Such a peace would bring no security for us or for our neighbors. Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. As a nation we may take pride in the fact that we are soft-hearted; but we cannot afford to be soft-headed.

We must always be wary of those who with sounding brass and a tinkling cymbal preach the "ism" of appeasement. We must especially beware of that small group of selfish men who would clip the wings of the American eagle in order to feather their own nests.The Four Freedoms were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D.

Roosevelt on January 6, In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people "everywhere in the world" ought to enjoy.

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This speech delivered by President Franklin Roosevelt on January 6, , became known as his "Four Freedoms Speech," due to a short closing portion describing the President's vision in which the American ideals of individual liberties were extended throughout the world.

his speech delivered by President Franklin Roosevelt on January 6, , became known as his "Four Freedoms Speech," due to a short closing portion describing the President's vision in which the American ideals of individual liberties were extended throughout the world.

Rhetorical Analysis of President Roosevelt's Pearl Harbor Speech Words 6 Pages “Yesterday, December 7th, a date which will live in infamy- the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan” (1). Franklin D. Roosevelt's Address to Congress January 6, Chapter 36 In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.

January 6, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt addresses a joint session of Congress in his "Four Freedoms" speech.

Franklin D. Roosevelt, The "Four Freedoms" Address to Congress